Home News Xbox Wireless Headphones: Best Budgeted Headphone Where Engineering Won!

Xbox Wireless Headphones: Best Budgeted Headphone Where Engineering Won!

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Xbox Wireless Headphones: Best Budgeted Headphone Where Engineering Won!

The Xbox Wireless Headset may be the ideal game headset for those who work from home. That’s because, in addition to automatically matching with your Xbox, it can also pair with your phone or PC at the same time, allowing you to take calls or listen to podcasts while playing.

Now, we’re not encouraging you to play Halo in the middle of a crucial meeting, so using a single headset for work and play without having to continuously reconnect any gadgets is a major plus. That’s on top of the fact that Microsoft’s new headset sounds fantastic in games and is easy enough to wear all day for just $99.

The familiar Xbox Series X boot-up sound greets you as you turn on the headset by clicking the light green power button on the left-hand side. When you shut them down, mute the microphone, or pair the headphones, you get audio prompts that Xbox owners can know right away.

Although not all will be affected, one critique we have of the Xbox Wireless Headset is that the ear cups might be too small for those with larger heads and ears. The oval ear cushions are made of polyurethane leather and have foam cushioning, so they’re not painful by any means, but we did note that this reviewer’s especially wide ears were a little tender after a few hours.

Unlike other Xbox-compatible headphones, the XWH also has a handy simultaneous-source feature. Its “wireless sync” button looks for Bluetooth and Xbox connections at the same time, allowing you to link it to your smartphone or other Bluetooth devices (albeit, sadly, not PlayStation consoles as of press time). You could think of this as a way to take the XWH for a stroll when you’re not playing Xbox, and you could be right.

The strongest reason to use this method is that you can attach one Bluetooth device and one Xbox device at the same time. And, at least in my initial research, the XWH manages this deftly. Third-party multimedia applications for background audio are supported natively on Xbox consoles, which is convenient when you want to listen to music while playing a game. By allowing you to toggle on any random app on your Bluetooth computer, XWH broadens the scope of this use case. Whatever audio you’re listening to (podcasts, white noise machines, etc. ), send it straight to your XWH.

It also takes precedence when your Bluetooth system needs microphone power, whether from a phone call or a voice-chat app like Discord. This is my ideal use case, but if you’re trying to keep your mic on with your native Xbox “party” while also calling Domino’s through Bluetooth, be warned: the pizza (or your Discord posse) will take precedence. Furthermore, the chat balance wheel doesn’t allow you to change volume between your Xbox and Bluetooth sources; you’ll have to adjust Bluetooth volume manually through its system controls. (Unfortunately, the chat-balance dial does not appear to function on Windows 10.)

Sound Quality

We were both impressed and worried when we first put the Xbox Wireless Headset on because of how bass-heavy the sound signature was. The Xbox Wireless Headset will not disappoint if you like nothing more than a hard thumping bassline. It has amazing bass reproduction, and there were moments when we felt like we were listening to a DJ’s subwoofer. Seriously, these are incredible at producing the low-end sound that so many people crave. There’s even a bass boost option that goes up to +12, which, given how low these headphones can go, seems a little excessive.

Although this is all well and good, having a pair of headphones that are solely focused on bass isn’t suitable for competitive shooters or even more cinematic single-player experiences. Too much bass will overwhelm and muddy the other, equally significant frequencies, resulting in a muffled sound that won’t help you in online multiplayer games.

Thankfully, Microsoft crafted the Xbox Wireless Headset to be suitable for anyone, as the sound can be customised to your preferences. You can choose from a variety of equalisers in the Xbox Accessories app, including Game, Movie, Music, and Voice. Although none of those choices were quite right for this reviewer, you can also change the six EQ levels to your taste. It’s at this stage where the Xbox Wireless Headset really shines.

We’re used to a more open soundstage, so we used the Xbox Accessories software to – the bass to a level where it could still provide a pleasing thud while not obliterating any other frequency. We decided to be able to hear voices a little more as well. After some careful tuning during our research, we came up with a sound signature that checked all the boxes and sounded great no matter what we were doing: listening to music, playing video games, or simply watching YouTube videos.

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When using spatial audio, such as Windows Sonic and Dolby Atmos, these headphones sound fantastic. If you don’t already have Dolby Atmos, simply connecting the Xbox Wireless Headset will offer you six months of free access, so there’s no reason not to check it out. Despite being a closed-back pair of headphones with excellent noise isolation, the best Dolby Atmos Xbox Series X games sounded crystal clear and informative. The sound was never too closed off, and the soundstage was large enough to provide the compelling 360-degree audio effect that Dolby Atmos is known for.

We can’t stress enough how engrossing the audio quality on these headphones is after you’ve fiddled with the EQ settings. It’s amazing that you can get this level of audio output for under $100, and Microsoft deserves a lot of credit for including a pair of 40mm drivers that respond so quickly to user feedback. EQs aren’t fresh, but we’ve noticed that no matter how often we fiddle with some levels, certain headsets can’t really be tweaked to deliver positive results. In contrast, the Xbox Wireless Headset is incredibly malleable in this respect, and it pays off handsomely.

Owing to the quality of our ears, age, and ability to hear those frequencies, good audio will always be subjective. It’s a relief, then, that Microsoft avoided the “one sound fits all” approach used by certain manufacturers and instead provided consumers with an excellent base on which to explore what sounds best for them.

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Because of its ability to receive over-the-air updates, the Xbox Wireless Headset may be enhanced in the future.

Microphone quality and wireless connectivity

The microphone on the Xbox Wireless Headset has a special feature that works well. The microphone actually pulls down and can be tucked away when not in use, rather than being detachable or retractable. It lies a few inches away from your face on the left side, but thanks to Microsoft’s voice isolation technology, it still picks up your voice clearly.

When the mic is switched on, a white indicator light illuminates, letting you know if you’re broadcasting to the world. The mute button is at the end of the mic’s housing, and it’s easy to find with your left thumb.

Clicking it will also play a helpful audio notification, allowing you to double-check that your microphone is switched off.

There’s even a clever auto-mute feature on the microphone that works surprisingly well. The microphone can try to cancel out any constant background noise, such as that generated by an air conditioner. When we stopped speaking, the Xbox Wireless Headset did a good job of isolating the music we were playing from our phone on the high setting.

Thankfully, we didn’t experience any drops or disconnects when using the Xbox Wireless Headset. During our testing, the battery life was also more than adequate, lasting between 12 and 15 hours on a single charge. The headset takes three hours to completely charge, but 30 minutes of charging gives you four hours of power, which is very convenient.

Xbox Wireless Headset – Release Date and Price

The Xbox Wireless Headset will be available on March 16, 2021, for $99.99 / £89.99 / AU$149.95. It’s reasonably priced for a wireless headset, undercutting the SteelSeries Arctis 9x while providing similar features like Bluetooth connectivity and a high-quality microphone.

Extras – Design

The Xbox Wireless Headset from Microsoft closely resembles the design language of the Xbox Series X. The all-black style is accented with subtle details including thin green rings around the outside of each earcup and an embossed Xbox logo on the right side. The inside of the earcups, which are conveniently labelled with big ‘L’ and ‘R’ letters, has a slight green hue that seeps through the mesh, and the drivers are also coated in Xbox’s familiar brand paint.

The familiar Xbox Series X boot up sound greets you as you turn on the headset by clicking the light green power button on the left-hand side. When you shut them down, mute the microphone, or pair the headphones, you get audio prompts that Xbox owners can know right away.

Thanks to the rubberized dials used on another of Microsoft’s audio products, the Surface Headphones, changing volume or balancing game, and voice chat is a breeze on the Xbox Wireless Headset. To change the volume or chat, simply turn either the left or right rubberized earcup dial, and gradual changes are simple to make.

The Xbox Wireless Headset feels designed to last, despite its largely plastic nature, and the materials used convey a real premium feel that belies the $100 price tag Microsoft has managed to reach. During our testing, the Xbox Wireless Headset didn’t creak, and the overall clamping force was more than adequate to ensure a secure fit.

The headset is light enough at 312g that you won’t notice it weighing you down after hours of play. Because of the headset’s 32 Ohm impedance, you can turn up the volume with ease, and the speaker response of 20Hz – 20kHz can ensure that no audio specifics you’ve come to expect in your favorite games are lost.

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Although not all will be affected, one critique we have of the Xbox Wireless Headset is that the ear cups might be too small for those with larger heads and ears. The oval ear cushions are made of polyurethane leather and have foam cushioning, so they’re not painful by any means, but we did note that this reviewer’s especially wide ears were a little tender after a few hours.

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